Kindle

The future is now It feels more like a book than an electronic device. It reads like a book but with the ability to hold over 200 titles on a device that weighs less than a McDonalds Quarter Pounder. It’s the new Amazon Kindle. Kindle has a crisp black-and-white screen that resembles the readability and appearance of printed paper. The screen works using ink, just like books and newspapers, but displays the ink particles electronically. It uses no backlighting and reflects light like ordinary paper.

Eliminating the glare associated with other electronic displays. The future is now. Screen 600×800 px, 167 ppi resolution, 6″ diagonal, 7.5″ x 5.3″ size, 4-level grayscale Electronic paper, LCD side scroller. The Downside It can only read text files and Amazon’s own proprietary format by default, and the only way you can can view html, doc, pdf, jpeg, gif, bmp and png is to e-mail them to Amazon to have them converted.

At a cost. NOTE: This was true of the first generation. I am about to take delivery of a brand new Kindle and will be using it to its fullest and will report back about its pros and cons.Jeffrey Bezos (Amazon Founder and Chief Executive Officer) letter to shareholders November 19, 2007, was a special day. After three years of work, we introduced Amazon Kindle to our customers. Many of you may already know something of Kindle—we’re fortunate (and grateful) that it has been broadly written and talked about.

Briefly, Kindle is a purpose-built reading device with wireless access to more than 110,000 books, blogs, magazines, and newspapers. The wireless connectivity isn’t WiFi—instead it uses the same wireless network as advanced cell phones, which means it works when you’re at home in bed or out and moving around. You can buy a book directly from the device, and the whole book will be downloaded wirelessly, ready for reading, in less than 60 seconds.

There is no “wireless plan,” no year-long contract you must commit to, and no monthly service fee. It has a paper-like electronic-ink display that’s easy to read even in bright daylight. Folks who see the display for the first time do a double-take. It’s thinner and lighter than a paperback, and can hold 200 books. Take a look at the Kindle detail page on Amazon.com to see what customers think—Kindle has already been reviewed more than 2,000 times.

As you might expect after three years of work, we had sincere hopes that Kindle would be well received, but we did not expect the level of demand that actually materialized. We sold out in the first 5 1?2 hours, and our supply chain and manufacturing teams have had to scramble to increase production capacity. We started by setting ourselves the admittedly audacious goal of improving upon the physical book. We did not choose that goal lightly. Anything that has persisted in roughly the same form and resisted change for 500 years is unlikely to be improved easily.

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